magnolius:

Head On installation by the renowned Cai Guo-Qiang , consisting of 99 life-sized replicas of wolves.

With few wolves scattered in the front gallery, all ninety-nine wolves run, gallop, and jump toward the far end of the exhibition hall, where a wall stands. The bravery of the wolves is met head on by the unyielding wall. As the leading wolves go down, many more follow with force and determination. As those in the front fall and pile up, those behind take up their positions.

  
magnolius:

Head On installation by the renowned Cai Guo-Qiang , consisting of 99 life-sized replicas of wolves.

With few wolves scattered in the front gallery, all ninety-nine wolves run, gallop, and jump toward the far end of the exhibition hall, where a wall stands. The bravery of the wolves is met head on by the unyielding wall. As the leading wolves go down, many more follow with force and determination. As those in the front fall and pile up, those behind take up their positions.

 

magnolius:

Head On installation by the renowned Cai Guo-Qiang , consisting of 99 life-sized replicas of wolves.

With few wolves scattered in the front gallery, all ninety-nine wolves run, gallop, and jump toward the far end of the exhibition hall, where a wall stands. The bravery of the wolves is met head on by the unyielding wall. As the leading wolves go down, many more follow with force and determination. As those in the front fall and pile up, those behind take up their positions.

 

supersonicelectronic:

Recent work by Reza Rasoli.
Tumblr | Twitter
supersonicelectronic:

Recent work by Reza Rasoli.
Tumblr | Twitter
supersonicelectronic:

Recent work by Reza Rasoli.
Tumblr | Twitter
supersonicelectronic:

Recent work by Reza Rasoli.
Tumblr | Twitter

lightnin hopkins - “lonesome road”

"hello? is that the 80’s calling me on my iphone?

slothattachedtotree:

tmblg:

Louis Armstrong playing for his wife in Giza, Egypt

(via somethingchanged)

duke ellington and his orchestra/harry carney - “sophisticated lady”

If you got da time, this is fabulous:

jazzpages:

‘Jazz On A Summer’s Day’, a film by Bert Stern

In 1958, fashion photographer Bert Stern (famous for Marilyn Monroe’s last photo shoot ’The Last Sitting’, six weeks before her death) set out to make a film about the annual Jazz festival in Newport, Rhode Island. 

He approached his subject as an occasion to prove that music didn’t have to be merely recorded; the film making itself could be as artful as the onstage sound. So the movie is itself a piece of jazz; in the first half of the film, the camera often wanders away from the stage to fixate on the crowd and the boats in the America’s Cup yacht races, thus creating a great time capsule. 

Fielding five cameras simultaneously, some handheld and some with telephoto lenses, and using the finest Kodak positive-reversal color film, Stern captured brilliant images that, as he said ‘just jumped off the screen’. Usually jazz films are all black and white, kind of depressing and in little downstairs nightclubs. This brought jazz out into the sun. It was different.’

Hence the selection for preservation in the United States National Film Registry as being ‘culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant’.

Jazz On A Summer's Day

ladies and gentlemen, vincent cassel.

theimpossiblecool:

Love may not make the world go round, but I must admit that it makes the ride worthwhile. ~ Sean Connery

theimpossiblecool:

Love may not make the world go round, but I must admit that it makes the ride worthwhile. ~ Sean Connery

monk, of the thelonious variety

monk, of the thelonious variety

For Spee's Sake

Freddie Hubbard — Hub-Tones

Listen

jazzpages:

‘For Spee’s Sake’, by Freddie Hubbard

Freddie Hubbard - Hub-Tones

In 1962 (the year of release of this album), Hubbard was still a full time member of The Jazz Messengers, but still had time to record 3 solo albums:
The Artistry Of Freddie Hubbard’, ‘Here To Stay’ and ‘Hub-Tones’. 
While the former two have a lot of that unmistakable Messengers style, ‘Hub-Tones’ sounds a lot more like two of Hubbard’s collaborations from a few years earlier: ‘Free Jazz’ and ‘Olé Coltrane’. On ‘Hub-Tones’, Hubbard uses the freedom forged by Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane, but stays grounded to the classic Blue Note sound.

Freddie Hubbard - Trumpet
James Spaulding - Alto Saxophone
Herbie Hancock - Piano
Reggie Workman - Bass
Clifford Jarvis - Drums